A Psalm in the Midst of the Coronavirus

bible on table

Today in my reading of the Psalms, I particularly landed on Psalm 55. It’s a lament, which seems appropriate for this current season of the Coronavirus pandemic. Continue reading

Poverty in Our World

Last week I posted about Faith Perspectives in Our World. I shared some data from two particular sources, one being Daniel Groody’s Globalization, Spirituality & Justice (3rd edition from 2015). It considers stats from the perspective of reducing the world to a village of 100 people. Continue reading

We Have More in Common with the People of the World Than We Think

 

people-of-the-worldSomeone introduced me to this video yesterday. The video is not simply about DNA testing; it’s about becoming aware that we may just be connected to people groups we may not have imagined — even those we may despise.

Perhaps we should guard against superior and inferior perspectives when it comes to ethnic (and all sorts of) identity. Perhaps we can move toward “others” with hospitality rather than hostility. Continue reading

The Call for Westerners to Learn from the Majority World

theology in the context of world christianityI’m currently reading a book entitled, Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church Is Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss Theology. To some, it might sound bland. However, for me, it is a topic of utmost import within discussion of theology and church.

Why?

Well it starts in the reality that Christianity is now largest, and strongest, in the majority world (what some might call the “western world” or “developing world”). This is mainly due to the expansive efforts of Pentecostalism and the charismatic movement right across Latin America, Africa and Asia. This can be noted from such works as Global Pentecostalism: The New Face of Christian Social Engagement and The Century of the Holy Spirit: 100 Years of Pentecostal and Charismatic Renewal, 1901-2001. There are others as well, but suffice it to say that the Pentecostal, charismatic and neo-charismatic branches of the church have now reached epic proportions, totaling some 600 million Christians in the world today. Continue reading