Sycamore Row – by John Grisham

Sycamore_Row_-_cover_art_of_hardcover_book_by_John_GrishamThis past weekend, I completed John Grisham’s most recent novel, Sycamore Row. I’ve read all his books (except for a couple of the children’s novels). This was truly an enjoyable read, mainly for 3 reasons:

1) I hadn’t read a fiction novel in a few month’s time, with my head mainly stuck in theology.

2) The book takes you back to where Grisham’s novels all began: the 1980’s in Clanton, Mississippi. Specifically it connects back to his first published novel, A Time to Kill.

3) For me, the book had a good, emotion-evoking end.

Here’s the Amazon blurb: Continue reading

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Lewis and Tolkien Debate Myths and Lies

JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis went on a walk one September day in 1931. The conversation enacted below captures some of the issues that came up.

This is why I might argue that God is first and foremost a story-teller, rather than a theologian. Continue reading

William Paul Young’s New Book: Cross Roads

imagesRecently, now that it’s been a few years following the great debates over the controversial fiction work, The Shack, I decided to re-read the book once again. Doing such can give fresh perspective, especially knowing the emotional charge has moved on.

I appreciated the opportunity to read it once again. A few years back, after reading it the first time, I gave The Shack a positive review overall (my reviews: article 1, article 2, article 3). Going back, I can see some of the theological challenges that some felt were unhelpful. Still, I think more than anything, the book accomplished 2 major points: a) to break down some of the boxes and barriers of our theology concerning our infinite God and b) laid out a beautiful picture of the relational nature of the Trinity amongst themselves and their desire for such relationship with humanity.

Now, some 5 years after the release of The Shack, William Paul Young has come out with a second title: Cross Roads. Continue reading