Love of Self

Yesterday our youngest was telling my wife & I that he loved us.

“I love you mommy. I love you daddy. I also love Shadow [our puppy].”

He then said something that caught my attention even more.

“I love me, too.” [speaking of himself]

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Spiritual Rhythms for the Enneagram

The Enneagram is the personality fad of today. It’s everywhere, and especially within Christian circles. Some love it; some roll their eyes at it; and some still may not know what it is.

I have been personally studying the Enneagram for the past three and a half years and believe it to be a unique personality typing system. Of course, there are many other personal and professional typing methods available—Myers-Briggs Type IndicatorStrengthsFinder, and DiSC profile, to name a few. Still, I’ve not yet found a tool as helpful in understanding not just the what or how of one’s personality, but also the why. It gets into the nitty-gritty of the motivation behind why we live and view life the way we do. This creates a helpful framework of understanding self, as well as understanding others. I’ve found it so unique that I have made it part of the curriculum in a leadership class I teach.

One book that I have recently revisited is Spiritual Rhythms for the Enneagram, by the Calhoun’s and Loughrige’s. Alongside Chris Heuertz’s The Sacred Enneagram, it is one of my favorite’s thus far. I particularly enjoy the emphasis of utilizing the Enneagram for spiritual formation. Not that the Enneagram is some intrinsically Christian tool. But it is a tool nonetheless, one that I believe can help with understanding self – how one was created, what pains (and trauma) we are dealing with, all in order to connect with our loving Creator and find wholeness.

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Women Theologians on Our Shelves

This week we had our PhD Symposium for the School of Divinity at the University of Aberdeen. My particular area is Practical Theology.

As many things still remain, this was virtual. So I was grateful to be able to easily attend.

In the final session, we had a Q & A panel with the faculty. One question was what are they currently reading and why it is important to them. One member, Dr. Katie Cross, who is a prominent voice in feminist theology today, shared some insights about reading women in theology. From that, she also shared a post by Maggie Dawn, who is herself a professor of theology at St Mary’s College, Durham University. This post lists a plethora of resources on women writers in theology. These women do not just write about women’s issues. They speak into all things theological. And that’s how it is supposed to be!

Interestingly, this is how Maggie Dawn introduces her own post:

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Junia, the Woman Apostle?

Junia? Who is that?

She’s a biblical character who doesn’t get much attention, really, unless one is discussing the role of women in the church. Particularly, are women allowed to be leaders (apostles, pastors, teachers, elders, etc) in the church?

Where does Junia show up in Scripture?

Romans 16:7. This is the passage:

Greet Andronicus and Junia, my fellow Jews who have been in prison with me. They are outstanding among the apostles, and they were in Christ before I was.

That’s it.

With that, at first glance, it seems this passage is of little consequence. But as noted above, it becomes not central, but still an important discussion piece, when complementarians and egalitarians debate the role of women.

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