We Have More in Common with the People of the World Than We Think

 

people-of-the-worldSomeone introduced me to this video yesterday. The video is not simply about DNA testing; it’s about becoming aware that we may just be connected to people groups we may not have imagined — even those we may despise.

Perhaps we should guard against superior and inferior perspectives when it comes to ethnic (and all sorts of) identity. Perhaps we can move toward “others” with hospitality rather than hostility. Continue reading

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The Call for Westerners to Learn from the Majority World

theology in the context of world christianityI’m currently reading a book entitled, Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church Is Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss Theology. To some, it might sound bland. However, for me, it is a topic of utmost import within discussion of theology and church.

Why?

Well it starts in the reality that Christianity is now largest, and strongest, in the majority world (what some might call the “western world” or “developing world”). This is mainly due to the expansive efforts of Pentecostalism and the charismatic movement right across Latin America, Africa and Asia. This can be noted from such works as Global Pentecostalism: The New Face of Christian Social Engagement and The Century of the Holy Spirit: 100 Years of Pentecostal and Charismatic Renewal, 1901-2001. There are others as well, but suffice it to say that the Pentecostal, charismatic and neo-charismatic branches of the church have now reached epic proportions, totaling some 600 million Christians in the world today. Continue reading

The Religious State of the World

mission worldI am currently taking a class at Fuller Seminary entitled Church & Mission in a Global Context. I greatly appreciate church, church history and mission, and this class is scratching each of those itches.

Early on in the class, we viewed a short, 9-minute video from the Lausanne Global Leadership Forum in 2013. There is a large amount of statistics to process within this brief presentation. Nonetheless, it provides some interesting insights into the religious, and Christian, make-up of our world.

Check out the video below. Continue reading

Global Christianity Numbers Today

I read these words today from The Pew Research Center’s report on global Christianity.

The number of Christians around the world has more than tripled in the last 100 years, from about 600 million in 1910 to more than 2 billion in 2010. But the world’s overall population also has risen rapidly, from an estimated 1.8 billion in 1910 to 6.9 billion in 2010. As a result, Christians make up about the same portion of the world’s population today (32%) as they did a century ago (35%).

Also, as one reads on, they will see the major shift in Christianity across the world – moving mainly from the north and western hemispheres and now into the eastern and southern hemispheres.

Some interesting statistics to ponder. I still believe God wants to renew things in Europe, renew things in a different way than what existed as western Christendom. But renew them nonetheless.

As the World Turns

Today, I read an interesting article from the BBC about what has happened amongst the BRIC’s in our world today.

What are BRIC’s?

It stands for Brazil, Russia, India and China.

For the past few decades, the world has typically identified strong economies and markets within 7 more developed (though not all ‘western’) countries. They are France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the UK, the US and Canada. Many call this group the G-7.

But now, with the 4 aforementioned BRIC countries, along with 3 others (Mexico, Indonesia and Turkey), we have what has been identified as the E-7, or the 7 emerging markets in our world today. Continue reading