Church of England Approves Women Bishops

images2Yesterday, a decision rang forth from the isle of Great Britain, specifically from the Church of England. As announced on their own website:

“The General Synod of the Church of England has today given its final approval for women to become bishops in the Church of England.”

The past 2 years goes something like this for the Church of England:

  • November 2012 – the vote to not allow women to function in the role of bishop.
  • November 2013 – the vote overwhelmingly in favor of female bishops.
  • July 2014 – final approval for women to become bishops.

Continue reading

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Church of England paves way for women bishops in 2014

church_of_england_logo(47)Just this week, this news came forth from the Church of England (Anglican community) in regards to women bishops:

The Church of England’s governing body voted overwhelmingly in favor of female bishops on Wednesday, ending a 20-year impasse that could see women ordained as senior clergy by the end of 2014.

A vote on a package of measures to endorse women bishops was supported by 378 members of the General Synod while eight voted against and 25 abstained after months of behind-the-scenes talks to unite reformers and traditionalists. Continue reading

A Year of Biblical Womanhood – Review

A-year-of-biblical-womanhood-bookJust over a year ago, popular blogger and speaker, Rachel Held Evans, released her second book to date, A Year of Biblical Womanhood.  Here blog can be found at www.rachelheldevans.com.

I know I’m a little late to the game with both reading and reviewing the book. This was mainly due to the fact that I’m already well convinced that God’s kingdom rule functions from the perspective of mutuality between men and women (what most call egalitarianism). However, I did read many of the early book reviews and comments (from both “sides” of the fence), and I just recently found a good time to purchase the book, as it was available for $2.99 in the Kindle format a few weeks back.

Thus, I’ll share some reflections after reading the book. Continue reading

Junia Is Not Alone

Not too long ago, I finished a new little ebook written by Scot McKnight and published by Patheos Press. It is entitled Junia Is Not Alone.

First off, the book is about 25-30 pages in normal length and it is only available electronically for the Kindle or Kindle app for a mere $2.99. I think this is an interesting pointer of where publishing is going – electronic and short. Not all books will be of this flavour. There will still remain the theological treatises that most of us don’t want to engage with or the lengthier books that we do still want to read. But these short ebooks are becoming a trend in a technological world today.

So here is Scot McKnight’s first compact ebook along the lines of something he has briefly addressed before in his book about understanding the Bible, The Blue Parakeet. In this newer title, McKnight starts out by asking why the overall church is quite silent on the reality of women in the Bible. Who has heard many teachings and sermons on Huldah or Phoebe or Priscilla or Mary (the mother of Jesus) or Anna or the enigmatic Junia? We have occasionally heard teachings on Ruth or Esther, but that is because a specific book of the Bible is dedicated to them. But what of these other gifted women? Continue reading

Martha & Mary: Not Primarily About Quiet Times

Martha and MaryThere’s a well-known passage found in Luke’s gospel. It’s the short account of Jesus and the disciples’ visit to the town of Martha and Mary. The account is found in Luke 10:38-42:

38 As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. 39 She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. 40 But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”

41 “Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things, 42 but few things are needed—or indeed only one. Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.”

When this text is usually taught and preached, there is one point that takes prominence: We need not get caught up in doing so many things for Jesus, but rather we are personally called to sit at his feet so that we might listen and learn from him. So let’s take time to schedule in some kind of personal devotional time of reading Scripture and prayer.

Something of that nature.

And this is not terribly off-base, knowing our call to listen to and seek the Lord. But I’m not so sure this is the primary message of this little portion found in Luke’s gospel.

Rather, here is what I think we should consider as the central point. Continue reading