Misreading Scripture With Western Eyes (3)

Misreading Scripture with Western EyesIt’s been a few weeks since my last post, but I want to continue walking through Randolph Richards’ and Brandon O’Brien’s book, Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes. So far, I’ve posted these 3 articles:

  • Preview of the book
  • Chapter 1 – Mores (the fundamental moral values of a group that go without saying)
  • Chapter 2 – Race & Ethnicity

Now it’s time to move on to chapter 3, which looks at the subject of language. Continue reading

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Misreading Scripture With Western Eyes (2)

Misreading Scripture with Western EyesI want to continue on with my series of engaging with Randolph Richards’ and Brandon O’Brien’s book, entitled Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes. If interested in the 2 previous posts, here is the preview and here are my thoughts on chapter 1.

I was also interested to find that Internet Monk is carrying a similar series. Read their part 1 and part 2 thus far.

Chapter 1 was all about the mores (pronounced mawr-eyz) of the ancient biblical world. These are simply the fundamental moral values of a group that go without saying. Chapter 2 is about race and ethnicity. And just a reminder that we are still at the ‘tip of the iceberg’, meaning these are issues that are quite easy to perceive in noting the difference between the perspectives of the ancient near east (those of biblical times) and the modern western world. Continue reading

Misreading Scripture With Western Eyes (1)

images-1A few weeks back, I gave a brief preview of a book that I’ve been reading through lately. The book is entitled Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes, co-authored by Randolph Richards and Brandon O’Brien, and it gives a good introduction to the discipline of hermeneutics, or helping us better grasp how to interpret, understand and apply Scripture.

In specific, there are 9 chapters which consider 9 different blinders we might have when interpreting Scripture. And, so, I want to post an article exploring the particulars of each ‘blinder’.

Firstly, I need to remind us that the book is broken down into 3 sections, mainly likening these blinders to the picture of an iceberg. With an iceberg, one can see a bit of the ice mountain poking out of the ocean, but below the surface lies a massive structure, mostly unseen by the human eye. And, so, the first 3 chapters deal with 3 issues that are more easily detected. So remember this, as some of these issues early on won’t seem too earth-shattering.

Chapter 1 considers the topic of mores (pronounced mawr-eyz). Basically, these are the fundamental moral values of a group that go without saying. These moral values wouldn’t need any detailed explanation, as they are simply given within a particular people’s setting.

Such mores are to be found within the Bible as well, mainly because the biblical text was written to particular people within a particular culture and setting. Certain things were already clear to them, but not to us. Continue reading

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes – Preview

images-1On my list of books I hope to read in 2013, the first one mentioned is entitled Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes, co-authored by Randolph Richards and Brandon O’Brien. I’m actually currently reading this work right now. In all, the book gives a good introduction to the discipline of hermeneutics, or helping us better grasp how to interpret, understand and apply Scripture.

Both authors are solid, evangelical thinkers. In particular, Richards is dean of the School of Ministry and professor of biblical studies at Palm Beach Atlantic University. O’Brien is a part-time instructor of religion at the College of DuPage and editor-at-large for Leadership journal with Christianity Today.

Within evangelicalism, we have a history of strongly holding the Bible, or Holy Scripture, as God’s great revelation of himself. There are many words used to describe the nature of the text – inspired, God-breathed, infallible, inerrant, authoritative, etc. I am not here to argue which terms best describe the Bible. But we can all recognise how very important the Scripture text stands, and not just amongst evangelicals, but the church historic and worldwide today. Continue reading

Tattoos, Mixed Clothing & Cooking Goats

As I mentioned a few posts back, I’m working through a particular Bible-reading programme, the ‘Bible in 90 Days’. Yeah, it’s a challenge! I’m probably a week behind where I’m supposed to be, but I’m still getting through large chunks at a time. It’s nice.

Just a few days ago I finished the Pentateuch, those first 5 books of the Old Testament – Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. To say the least, we don’t normally run to this territory for much devotional reading, at least outside Genesis.

But let’s also be honest – This portion of Scripture is very hard to come by, to understand, both in how it played out then and how it is to play out today. Continue reading