Miracles Today

miraclesDr. Craig Keener, professor of New Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary, discusses the miraculous works of God today. He looks at both Scriptural arguments and church history evidence of such realities in a massive tome called Miracles (1200+ pages). You can also view short video bytes where some points are briefly looked at, these being more easily digestible. And, even more, Keener is one that was a bit more skeptical about miracles still being a part of life today. Needless to say, God slowly changed his mind.

Below is one of those short videos. Continue reading

The Day I Stopped Speaking to My Wife

I remember the early days of our relationship. In the 9 months between meeting and marrying, my wife and I were only in the same city a mere 40 days or so. We were divided most of the time by an ocean, but thankfully had great support in both the US and UK. Therefore, in those many days apart (even when we were both in the UK), we spent much time emailing and texting by phone. I’m talking about emailing and texting a whole lot! It was all-consuming as we looked to stay in touch day after day after day.

As our relationship heightened, we began calling each other, though we also maintained the little love notes via text as well. Our mobile phones were the major place of communication. I remember one month my UK mobile phone bill was around 85 GBP, which was some 50 GBP more than the normal monthly bill. I was shocked, but it was truly worth it in my eyes.

We also moved into the realm of love-letter writing. After moving back to the US, being even further apart from my beloved, this became an integral part of staying in contact, expressing our heart’s desire for one another. And, of course, both of us saved each and every one of those emotion-stirring, affectionate letters. They were not just words. They were an expression of the love we had for one another. And being so far apart, you can imagine their role in articulating our deep affections.

Continue reading

Article Posted at The Pneuma Review

pneuma-reviewI’ve written on many issues at my blog related to continuationist theology – the view that all the gifts of God continue today, including such things as prophecy, tongues, miracles, healings, apostles, prophets, etc.

Today, an article of mine was posted at The Pneuma Review. This is a journal of ministry resources and theology for Pentecostals and charismatics. The article is entitled, “Does God Still Give Revelation Today?” Continue reading

The Pneuma Review & Craig Keener

Pneuma-ReviewThis week, I came across a newer online resource. It’s an online journal that particularly provides ministry resources and theological articles for Pentecostals and charismatics. It’s entitled The Pneuma Reviewpneuma being the Greek word for spirit.

The Pneuma Review lays forth their mission statement in this way:

“To lead Pentecostal/charismatic believers to a greater understanding of God’s Word and assisting church leaders in equipping the saints for the work of the ministry. We also long for greater dialogue between Evangelicals about doctrine, and by way of an open forum, to promote Biblically-centered theological discussion on the gifts of the Spirit.”

I ultimately came across it when I saw a tweet about Craig Keener’s review of Strange Fire, the new release of John MacArthur, which flows in tandem with the recent conference. Continue reading

Great Resources for Charismatic Theology

books460In light of a recent conference (I share here and here), I’ve been blogging a bit more about various issues on continuationist/charismatic theology – the belief that all gifts of God are still available today, just as they were for the early church we read about in the New Testament.

So I thought I would list 20 books that might be worth reading. They are not in any particular order of what I consider best. Rather, they are in alphabetical order by the author’s last name.

Some of them are commentary-like. Some of them are theologically driven. Some of them are more devotional. Some of them provide testimonies. And some of them are a conglomeration of these categories.

I hope they provide some good food for thought. Continue reading