Prophetic Dialogue

prophetic-dialogueToday I finished a book on mission entitled, Prophetic Dialogue: Reflections on Christian Mission Today. The work is offered by two Catholic missiologists, Stephen Bevans and Roger Schroeder.

I will go ahead and say this up front: This has been one of the best books on mission that I have ever read. It is spot on in considering many of the missional practices needed in our world today.

It’s thesis?

That mission should be walked out as prophetic dialogue. If mission is to be properly effective, it must embrace both sides of the mission coin, being both prophetic and dialogical. Continue reading

An Advent Study: Underdogs and Outsiders

underdogs-and-outsidersI recently finished a new book that hit the shelves a few weeks back. It’s entitled Underdogs and Outsiders, written by my good friend, Tom Fuerst. Though the main title may catch one off guard – noting it’s a study particularly written for the Advent season – it actually highlights the exact thrust of the book.

This new work from Fuerst is an Advent study in how God used five unexpected women – underdogs and outsiders, to be exact – to accomplish his redemptive purposes. In particular, these five women are found in Matthew’s genealogy – Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba and, or course, Mary. Continue reading

How to Survive a Shipwreck

how-to-survive-a-shipwreckWithin the past couple of weeks, I finished a book that was water to my soul. It was Jonathan Martin’s new release, How to Survive a Shipwreck: Help Is on the Way and Love Is Already Here. I appreciate Zondervan sending me a review copy!

Growing up in the south, being well-rooted in the Pentecostal movement, Martin was in full-time ministry by his early-20s and had planted Renovatus Church in his mid-20s. Yet, after eight years of leading that church, life had taken him out to sea, thrown him overboard, and he was now drowning in the midst of the stormy weather and monsters of the raging sea.

The book contains deeply personal, and poetic, reflections about Martin’s own “shipwreck.” Martin offers these words as a summary of the book:
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