Sunday Review – 14 November 2010

A few months back (way back in July), I had looked to take up regularly posting a Sunday Review on each Sunday, pointing to significant articles from the week that I have found on the blogs I frequently read. Well, I thought I might try and take up this practise again. We shall see if it stays consistent.

So here is my second edition.

1. Over at Near Emmaus, Brian LePort shares his Ten Personal Must Reads. I’ve posted a similar article in the past look at the 10 most significant books I have read, though I would probably add a couple of new books to the list, such as Inspiration and Incarnation by Peter Enns and The Charismatic Theology of St. Luke by Roger Stronstad.

2. Over at New Leaven, T.C. Robinson shares of a new release entitled Science, Creation, and the Bible: Reconciling Rival Theories of Origin. I would be interested to see him blog about his thoughts on the book, as I have recently begun to read on the issues of how science and faith work together, and especially if the evolutionary-creation view is a viable one. Robinson also posts about an interesting interview with Brian McLaren on predestination and sola Scriptura.

3. Andrew Perriman shares an insightful post asking this main question: How do we get from scripture as ancient religious text, which is at one level at least unquestionably what it is, to scripture as Word of God for the church today, which at one level at least is unquestionably what it needs to be? He also has posted an article on the prophetic relationship of the people of God to the “land”.

4. At Parchment & Pen, Michael Patton shares a brief overview of his teaching on suffering and evil. Lisa Robinson also shares a post with her own personal story and relates it to the question of how we determine if one has genuine faith or not.

5. Scot McKnight’s blog has been hosting a series entitled The Fall and Sin After Darwin, in which blogger, RJS, looks to assess issues in a recently released book entitled Theology After Darwin, as well as other particular essays dealing with such pertinent topics. I feel this has been a solid discussion so far around certain themes with regards to the bridging of scientific study with our faith, understanding the early chapters of Genesis, Adam & Eve as literal historical figures, sin and the fall, theodicy, Christology, etc, all in an era following Darwin’s scientific studies and book, The Origin of Species. Here are links to all 7 parts posted thus far: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5, part 6, part 7.

6. Roger Olson recently gave his thoughts on the new Pauline perspective, at least in regards to what we see in N.T. Wright’s and John Piper’s latest works on the subject – part 1, part 2.

7. InternetMonk, now headed up by Chaplain Mike, had a recent article about a specific woman in ‘ordained’ ministry – Angie Gage, associate pastor of Paragould United Methodist Church. I specifically appreciated these words from her: When one is authentically called into ministry, it is evidenced by his or her abilities, fruits of ministry, authenticity, and obedience to God’s vision and mission. By the way, if you did not know, I have been posting an extensive series on the role of women. You can read my most recent article on 1 Corinthians 11:3 and it also contains the links to my 10 other articles in the series. Next week, I hope to post my thoughts on Ephesians 5:22-24.

8. Chuck Swindoll shares a great post entitled Pastoral Laughter. It reminds me of what was spoken to me when I was publicly recognised and set in as an elder in my local church. There were five L’s shared with me, the last being to lighten up.

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