On Being the Body

We are all probably familiar with the descriptive imagery of God’s people as a body. For some, it is probably an overused image. But I still consider it as one of the most beautiful and enlightening metaphors to describe the people of God.

And, we also know that one of the most important passages that teaches us how the church is to function like a body is found in 1 Corinthians 12:12-31. No doubt that, when reading this passage, we must guard against the words being all too familiar, lest we disregard the life-giving words.

While you can take time to read the passage yourself (by clicking on the link above), I wanted to draw out 8 points I find very helpful from the passage. Though some points will be common to all, I do hope there will be some fresh understanding for all as well.

1. A body calls for unity (vs12-13).

While I believe God has called his worldwide body to unity, it is interesting to note that Paul gave these words to the local gathering of the Corinthians. I would say that worldwide unity of the body of Christ starts at the local level. How many local churches struggle with true unity? Most, if not all.

But how is unity created? I am not sure it first comes through Bible study of doctrine, per se, though those things are important. I believe it is, first and foremost, created through serving one another. It is amazing how unity is formed through washing people’s feet. But, most of the time, we don’t want to go there – because we don’t have time, we don’t have the vision for it, the other person has hurt us, etc. But I believe this stuff is the ‘bread and butter’ of seeing unity outworked in our midst.

And I love how all of this truly echoes Jesus’ words in John 17:20-23.

It might do us well to ponder afresh what it means to be unified, starting at the local body level.

2. A body has no room for individualism (vs14).

Unfortunately, the theology of many Christians is founded on this statement – me, Jesus and my Bible. But there is a major problem with such an ideology. It’s not found anywhere on the lips of Jesus, or in all of Scripture. Sure, we are called to each walk with God, that ‘personal relationship’, if you will. So I don’t want to negate such.

But we are also in this together as a covenant community. We have been joined together. It is about us and we much more than it is about I or me. Again, I am thinking back to Jesus’ prayer as recorded in John’s Gospel. I don’t want to live out the ‘lone ranger’ mentality, for I know we can accomplish so much more together than alone. And, again, let this start at the local level before trying to imagine such amongst the worldwide body of Christ.

3. A body allows for diversity (vs15-20).

What many of us really desire is that people were more like us, right? But, can I just say I am glad we are not all like you, or all like me. What a definitely boring idea if everyone were gifted in the same way. I’m glad God was not that boring in creating us.

Rather, Christ’s church must recognise that we are all created with different personalities and that God gifts each person differently. And this should definitely be seen as a plus rather than a negative. I am more of a teacher-pastor. So I am glad God gifts others in other areas. And even God has put together other teacher-pastors different from me. But we are not called to control the body of Christ and make them become us. They are to become Christ-like in who they are in Christ.

In all, we need the full reality of Christ through the full reality of His body.

4. A body recognises that God arranges as He chooses (vs18, see also vs11).

This really relates to the point I just made in #3. Such knowledge gives freedom for diversity and allows each member of the whole body to function in all that God has called them to. If you have a probably with Suzy being gifted and shaped in certain ways in regards to her calling in Christ, then take it up with Him, not her.

Of course, this does not give room for sin. Sin must be dealt with, though I suppose we don’t always deal with it in the most godly and compassionate of ways. But we need diversity or we will die out. I restate it – I am so glad God is not so boring as to create us all the same.

5. A body has interdependency and need of the others (vs21).

This echoes point #2 that I emphasised out of vs14. Even in our diverse personality and gifting, we are called to abstain from being overly individualistic. We are called to communion with one another, to building one another up, to being in relationship with one another, to be dependent upon one another. I think that church in Jerusalem following Pentecost had a pretty good idea about this (Acts 2:42-47).

6. A body sees the glory of weakness (vs22-24).

What a contradictory statement for the world, and maybe even for most of Christianity. While many love to focus on our strengths, and God does give us strengths, we are actually in need of those weaker parts as well.

It is Paul who reminds us that, as with our own physical bodies, we give more attention to the weaker parts. Do we not? Next time you stub your time, record your reaction. You will immediately hunch over, grab the hurt toe, pull that foot in the air, hop on the one good foot, make weird noises, and then go on to clean and dress the wound as needed. You took good care of that weaker part.

But, even more, the weaker parts are actually much needed. I have a friend with Asperger’s syndrome. Now, at the college where I used to be on staff, this student was given special assistance by another upperclass student, to help with studies, be there as a specific friend, providing any help where needed. And this student did need the special attention. But, you know what? In reality, in retrospect, I realised how much we were all being blessed by him. His childlike faith, his submitted heart, his willing spirit, his learning attitude. God taught us a lot from this one ‘weaker’ vessel.

And, let’s just be honest, we are all weak apart from the grace and power of God. So let’s get on with valuing those weaker parts. They have something to offer as well.

7. A body understands the importance of caring (vs25-26).

As a body, we are also a family. Family want to care one for another. We want to provide, serve, give, listen, share, and so much more. This is a great opportunity to imitate our Father who is so excellent at all of these things Himself.

8. A body understands we already are the body and we are not trying to get there (vs27).

I think this is a good point to end out on. Most of the time, we spend so much effort trying to attain something that is already ours in Christ. We already are saints, we already are sons and daughters, we already are forgiven, and, even in one sense, we are already reigning with Christ in the heavenlies (Ephesians 2:6).

Therefore, we already are a body. This is why Paul exhorted us to be ‘eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace’ (Ephesians 4:3). We are already here. So let’s be encouraged to walk out who we already are.

So, I have shared eight points I find highlighted in Paul’s well-known passage about God’s people functioning as a body. If we can catch a vision of what Christ meant when He meant His body, then I believe we will have an effect upon this planet like we’ve yet known.

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3 thoughts on “On Being the Body

  1. Unity in diversity is a real challenge for the church. Unfortunately denominations seem to either go one way or the other. E.g., Roman Catholic on unity and evangelicals on diversity. It’s hard to find middle ground.

  2. Pingback: Week in Review: 09.03.10 | Near Emmaus

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