Amazon to Release New Kindles

This week, Amazon announced the release of their new Kindles, with the company moving mainly to touch screen (though non-touch screen will still be available) and even announcing the release of their high-octane Kindle Fire.

As you can see in the picture above (click on the pic to enlarge), the prices range from $79 for the most basic Kindle and $199 for the most advanced product, the Kindle Fire. Continue reading

Favourite iPad Apps

I’ve had an iPad now for coming close to a year. It’s becoming an all-purpose device for me with regards to Bible reading, journaling, reading books, preaching from and communication device.

Mark Stevens, over at Near Emmaus, just purchased one and was asking for some of the better apps we all liked. I am no app-junky who downloads hundreds of apps, but I did list my top 10.

So here are my top 10 apps on my iPad (though not in any particular order, rather than the Kindle app being first): Continue reading

Videos in Honour of Steve Jobs

I think the world now knows that Steve Jobs has stepped down as CEO of Apple. But he will still be with the company as Chairman of the Board.

Whether an iPod, iPhone, iPad or Mac laptop or desktop, most of us have probably owned some kind of Apple device in our life. I just purchased the new MacBook Pro with OS X Lion. Quite a superb little computer.

For a little remembrance, and maybe some chuckles, I post below a pic showing the evolution of products in Apple/Mac, as well as the first commercial-adverts for the iPod and iPhone.

Enjoy! Continue reading

Google Translate App

Earlier this week, a friend of mine let me know about an application on iTunes called Google Translate.

Many of you will know I live in Belgium and am currently learning Dutch, as it is one of two main languages in Belgium (the other being French, though German is the official third language). On my iPhone, I had downloaded an app that translates Dutch to English, and vice versa. I think I probably paid $1.99 for it.

But this Google Translate app has to be the best translation app by far, mainly for 4 reasons:

  1. It’s free.
  2. You can translate text for 57 languages.
  3. For 15 of the languages, you can translate by speaking the text instead of typing it.
  4. For 23 of the languages, you can listen to your translation spoken aloud.

So, for me, this was great because English and Dutch (and French for later on) were included in the speaking and listening components of the translator. It’s not that I am going to be pulling this out to translate Dutch into English (or the other way around) every moment of the day. But I was simply fascinated that the voice recognition software clearly picked up my voice. I was doing test words, phrases and sentences that I already knew in Dutch, and they were spot on in translation! The only time it didn’t get it perfect was when I switched to a very southern, country American accent.

Anyways, if you have an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad, do a search on iTunes for Google Translate and download the app. And you can read about it more here.

Google eBookstore

The world is becoming more technologically savvy by the day. From Apple to Microsoft to Google to Facebook to Amazon to Twitter to Blackberry to Samsung to Sony. It is truly amazing what we can do with technology today.

Well, just this week, Google launched their very own eBookstore, Google eBooks, which goes in competition with Amazon’s eBooks via Kindle. But whereas you need your Kindle or Kindle application for iPod Touch, iPhone, iPad or other smart phone device to read an Amazon ebook, you can read your Google eBook from anywhere – all those devices mentioned above, your laptop, your desktop, your friend’s computer, etc. All you need is a Gmail account. This is what makes Google eBooks quite interesting.

As one reporter notes:

Google e-books is offering access to more than 2 million free public domain digital titles and hundreds of thousands of for-pay e-books—the exact figure is hard to pinpoint—giving the service an inventory of e-book content equal or at least potentially equal to Amazon.com’s more than 700,000 e-book titles. In addition, Google eBooks is partnering with independent bookstores and consumers can buy e-books through local stores that have signed on to offer titles through Google eBooks.

Anyone with a gmail account—roughly about 200 million people—has immediate access to buying and downloading books through Google eBooks.

And, Google eBooks has also made available a free application for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad and Android. So check it out. Unfortunately, for me living in Brussels, you cannot yet purchase Google eBooks. But I have already begun to download free texts they are offering such as Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

Below is also a short video to explain more.