God in My Everything

God in My EverythingA few days ago I finished Ken Shigematsu’s, God in My Everything: How an Ancient Rhythm Helps Busy People Enjoy God. This was the first book to read for our cohort as we launched into the doctoral studies at Fuller Seminary. Rather than a book on the intricacies of research or mission or theology, or a combination of any of these, this provided for an smooth take-off into this 4-year program of study. The goal was for our group to consider particular rhythms to enact over our program of study.

The book is of a similar vein as such spiritual classics as Richard Foster’s, Celebration of Discipline, and Dallas Willard’s, The Spirit of the Disciplines. The book draws us in to develop what the subtitle makes clear: developing a rhythm in life, as the saints of old have done for centuries, in order to help busy people enjoy the presence of God. Continue reading

Change for the First Time, Again: My Book to Be Published

wipf & stockIn recent years, I’ve had a growing desire to write. I started this blog nearly 7 years ago as an avenue to write short articles centered around theological issues, though adding in thoughts on various other topics.

The ultimate goal was to one day write books, but not only write lengthier works, but to have them published. One is willing to self-publish, just as a musical artist might be willing to self-produce, publish and market. With social media avenues, the internet, and Amazon, that’s not a difficult feat.

However, this past week I received a surprise email. Wipf & Stock Publishers have offered me a publishing contract on a book proposal I had recently submitted to them. Continue reading

The Call for Westerners to Learn from the Majority World

theology in the context of world christianityI’m currently reading a book entitled, Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church Is Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss Theology. To some, it might sound bland. However, for me, it is a topic of utmost import within discussion of theology and church.

Why?

Well it starts in the reality that Christianity is now largest, and strongest, in the majority world (what some might call the “western world” or “developing world”). This is mainly due to the expansive efforts of Pentecostalism and the charismatic movement right across Latin America, Africa and Asia. This can be noted from such works as Global Pentecostalism: The New Face of Christian Social Engagement and The Century of the Holy Spirit: 100 Years of Pentecostal and Charismatic Renewal, 1901-2001. There are others as well, but suffice it to say that the Pentecostal, charismatic and neo-charismatic branches of the church have now reached epic proportions, totaling some 600 million Christians in the world today. Continue reading

Junia: An Apostle or Not?

st_junia2.jpg_w540Yesterday was International Women’s Day. In light of such, I put up a link to an article of mine where I reviewed Scot McKnight’s short ebook, Junia Is Not Alone. The book is all of 25 pages.

In the book, McKnight discusses the enigmatic Junia (or Junias, in some translations). Many may not have heard of her, but she is mentioned at the end of Paul’s letter to the church in Rome. In those days, the major greetings came after the body of the letter. So we read about Junia, and Andronicus (her supposed husband), in Romans 16:7.

In particular, McKnight assesses 2 problems that have arisen over the centuries: Continue reading

Kingdom Conspiracy: Reflections

kingdom_conspiracyBack in fall, Brazos Press sent over a copy of Scot McKnight’s newest release, Kingdom Conspiracy: Returning to the Radical Mission of the Local Church. I am very grateful for the book, as I appreciate McKnight’s biblical-theological approaches.

Scot McKnight, professor at Northern Seminary, is one of the leading New Testament scholars of today. In all, this was a needed book in the discussion around our understanding of three key theological areas: the kingdom of God, church and mission. Continue reading