Mapping Your Academic Career

mapping your academic careerRecently, I received a review copy of a new title that came out this year, Gary Burge’s Mapping Your Academic Career: Charting the Course of a Professor’s Life. Burge is Professor of New Testament at Wheaton College.

Thanks to IVP for sending the copy!

Now I am keenly aware this won’t be a book to sell many copies in the popular market. But anyone involved in academia, and particularly Christian academic settings, this book can provide some helpful insights for one’s career as a professor. Continue reading

The Role of Stories in Life

peterson-wrk01.inddI’ve probably mentioned not a few times of my love for Eugene Peterson as a pastor-teacher. I can read and re-read any of Peterson’s work at any point. He’s simply one of my favorites. I recently decided to re-read Christ Plays in Ten Thousand Places: A Conversation in Spiritual Theology, which is part of Peterson’s “conversation” series. The book is based off the lines of a Gerald Manley Hopkins poem entitled As Kingfishers Catch Fire.

As kingfishers catch fire, dragonflies draw flame;
As tumbled over rim in roundy wells
Stones ring; like each tucked string tells, each hung bell’s
Bow swung finds tongue to fling out broad its name;
Each mortal thing does one thing and the same:
Deals out that being indoors each one dwells;
Selves — goes itself; myself it speaks and spells,
Crying Whát I dó is me: for that I came.

I say móre: the just man justices;
Keeps grace: thát keeps all his goings graces;
Acts in God’s eye what in God’s eye he is —
Chríst — for Christ plays in ten thousand places,
Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his
To the Father through the features of men’s faces.

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Books That Compel Us to Return


There are books that you read and, when finished, place back on the shelf to never again pick up.

There are books you read, find great enjoyment in them, and maybe have even sensed the words of impact upon the pages. Even as they sit upon the shelf, a glimpse at their spine reminds you of the lasting significance of those words.

Then there are books that you read, possibly shedding a tear or closing your eyes to soak in the content, sensing the voice of God himself ringing through the pages, but even more……you know you will, you must, dust off these works, returning to them again and again to feed upon the treasure at hand. To not do so would be considered a personal tragedy of the gravest kind.

One such book for me is Thomas Kelly’s A Testament of Devotion. It has had such an impact on my life for 12 years now, so much so that I listed it as one of the top 10 books that has impacted my life. I shall never be able to rid myself of this little work. Continue reading

N.T. Wright Engages Critics

The Paul DebateThe man pops out books like no one else’s business. And he’s one of the few who is able to engage at both the scholarly and popular level.

As a colleague of mine recently remarked, no one can ever take up Pauline studies (or New Testament or Jesus studies, for that matter) from now on without pouring over Wright’s works. He’s done that much work and has had that much effect over the past few decades!

Well, he’s throwing another work into the masses, set to go live on October 1st of this year.

The title?

The Paul Debate: Critical Questions for Understanding the Apostle.

What’s the gist of this shorter, 100-page or so work? Continue reading

N.T. Wright Speaks at Google

A couple of weeks ago, N.T. Wright was invited to speak at Google. Interesting, to say the least. I don’t believe Google is looking to “Christianize” itself by any means. Rather, they probably brought in a top-notch, well-known Christian scholar for ratings.

Regardless, he was at Google and he took the time to speak on a topic related to his newest book, Simply Good News. His premise: good news is not the same as good advice. Christians announce good news, not good advice.

Watch it below.

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