The Call for Westerners to Learn from the Majority World

theology in the context of world christianityI’m currently reading a book entitled, Theology in the Context of World Christianity: How the Global Church Is Influencing the Way We Think about and Discuss Theology. To some, it might sound bland. However, for me, it is a topic of utmost import within discussion of theology and church.

Why?

Well it starts in the reality that Christianity is now largest, and strongest, in the majority world (what some might call the “western world” or “developing world”). This is mainly due to the expansive efforts of Pentecostalism and the charismatic movement right across Latin America, Africa and Asia. This can be noted from such works as Global Pentecostalism: The New Face of Christian Social Engagement and The Century of the Holy Spirit: 100 Years of Pentecostal and Charismatic Renewal, 1901-2001. There are others as well, but suffice it to say that the Pentecostal, charismatic and neo-charismatic branches of the church have now reached epic proportions, totaling some 600 million Christians in the world today. Continue reading

Junia: An Apostle or Not?

st_junia2.jpg_w540Yesterday was International Women’s Day. In light of such, I put up a link to an article of mine where I reviewed Scot McKnight’s short ebook, Junia Is Not Alone. The book is all of 25 pages.

In the book, McKnight discusses the enigmatic Junia (or Junias, in some translations). Many may not have heard of her, but she is mentioned at the end of Paul’s letter to the church in Rome. In those days, the major greetings came after the body of the letter. So we read about Junia, and Andronicus (her supposed husband), in Romans 16:7.

In particular, McKnight assesses 2 problems that have arisen over the centuries: Continue reading

Kingdom Conspiracy: Reflections

kingdom_conspiracyBack in fall, Brazos Press sent over a copy of Scot McKnight’s newest release, Kingdom Conspiracy: Returning to the Radical Mission of the Local Church. I am very grateful for the book, as I appreciate McKnight’s biblical-theological approaches.

Scot McKnight, professor at Northern Seminary, is one of the leading New Testament scholars of today. In all, this was a needed book in the discussion around our understanding of three key theological areas: the kingdom of God, church and mission. Continue reading

Transforming Mission

Transforming-Mission-BoschDavid Bosch’s Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission stands as a heavyweight in regards to historical-missiological studies. Matter of fact, anyone that wants to take up studies in missiology should plan on reading this text at some point.

It stands in at a whopping 600+ pages and covers the theological history of mission like no other I’ve come across.

Let me share some brief thoughts and feedback on the text. Continue reading

Hans Küng on the Catholic Church

The Catholic Church A Short HistoryFrom beginning to end, Hans Küng’s book, The Catholic Church: A Short History, provides a critique of the Roman Catholic Church through and through. Yet, here is a voice from inside the ranks, if you will, with Küng having served as official theological consultant to the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), appointed by Pope John XXIII himself.

Still, because of the challenges Küng has voiced over the years, most of them summed up in this book, the Vatican withdrew his ecclesiastical teaching authority in 1979, especially in light of his criticism to the doctrine of papal infallibility.1 Nevertheless, through it all, Küng calls the Church of Rome his “spiritual home to the present day.”2 I’d say quite a testimony and challenge to many modern Christians who so easily exit stage left when things get challenging and tough within their own church context. Continue reading