Great Resources for Charismatic Theology

books460In light of a recent conference (I share here and here), I’ve been blogging a bit more about various issues on continuationist/charismatic theology – the belief that all gifts of God are still available today, just as they were for the early church we read about in the New Testament.

So I thought I would list 20 books that might be worth reading. They are not in any particular order of what I consider best. Rather, they are in alphabetical order by the author’s last name.

Some of them are commentary-like. Some of them are theologically driven. Some of them are more devotional. Some of them provide testimonies. And some of them are a conglomeration of these categories.

I hope they provide some good food for thought. Continue reading

The Grace Outpouring – Book Review

41Cibnde4PLTucked away in southwest Wales, in the United Kingdom, there you’ll find a house of prayer and retreat centre known as Ffald-y-Brenin (pronounced Fal (as in pal) duh brennin). This centre is led by Roy and Daphne Godwin.

There is a unique book that tells the story of Ffald-y-Brenin, co-authored by Roy Godwin and Dave Roberts. That book is entitled The Grace Outpouring. It’s a unique story of how Roy and Daphne came to lead the centre, as well as sharing stirring and powerful encounters they and others have had with the Holy Spirit while at Ffald-y-Brenin. Continue reading

Junia Is Not Alone

Not too long ago, I finished a new little ebook written by Scot McKnight and published by Patheos Press. It is entitled Junia Is Not Alone.

First off, the book is about 25-30 pages in normal length and it is only available electronically for the Kindle or Kindle app for a mere $2.99. I think this is an interesting pointer of where publishing is going – electronic and short. Not all books will be of this flavour. There will still remain the theological treatises that most of us don’t want to engage with or the lengthier books that we do still want to read. But these short ebooks are becoming a trend in a technological world today.

So here is Scot McKnight’s first compact ebook along the lines of something he has briefly addressed before in his book about understanding the Bible, The Blue Parakeet. In this newer title, McKnight starts out by asking why the overall church is quite silent on the reality of women in the Bible. Who has heard many teachings and sermons on Huldah or Phoebe or Priscilla or Mary (the mother of Jesus) or Anna or the enigmatic Junia? We have occasionally heard teachings on Ruth or Esther, but that is because a specific book of the Bible is dedicated to them. But what of these other gifted women? Continue reading

Rethinking Romans

JustificationThere is a lot of rethinking going on these days with regards to Paul’s writings, especially centred around the renowned letter of Paul to the church in Rome. Or we call it Romans.

The rethinking doesn’t simply centre around the ‘new perspective on Paul’ and justification, but this encompasses both the whole letter and the multiple parts of the whole.

Author’s such as Andrew Perriman are challenging us to read Romans in its first century, city of Rome context, which was prior to establishment of what became known as western Christendom (I say ‘became’ knowing that Christendom has fallen in western Europe).

Still, Perriman is asking us to consider what is going on for Paul, a second-temple Jew writing to a Jew-Gentile church in the capital city of a majorly pagan empire. What did it mean then? Not what did it mean to Luther as he stood against the imperial Roman Catholic Church of his day, nor even what it means from a ‘new Pauline perspective’.

Perriman’s book is entitled The Future of the People of God: Reading Romans Before and After Western Christendom, of which I posted a review of the book here.

Whether one agrees with the new Pauline perspective, with Tom Wright being its most popular, but not the only, proponent, I believe he offers some great thoughts in his book Justification: God’s Plan and Paul’s Vision.

With the quote below, he offers a ‘thought experiment’, asking this: What if the Reformation had started with Ephesians and Colossians, rather than Romans and Galatians? Continue reading